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wonders never cease

play list of the week: 9.9.09 beatles tribute

[caption id="attachment_466" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="click to listen"]Nine[/caption]In honor of the much-hyped release of the entire back catalog of Beatles albums remastered, we will mark this delightfully symmetrical day with a tribute to Beatles tributes and reinventions.

1. Revolution # 9 - The Durham Ox Singers A fitting start to mark the unique date, this really is just the regulars at a British Pub having a laugh, but they sing this complex, experimental, drifting composition a cappela and it actually sounds pretty good, at least if you fall into the camp that enjoyed the original version. 2. Drive My Car – The Donnas A revved up cover perfectly suited to the power rock of the Palo Alto quartet, they really make it seem like a tough job to pass up. 3. Why Don't We Do It In The Road - Lowell Fulson Oklahoma-born blues icon (and one of Ray Charles’ first bosses) puts his powerful voice and legendary guitar to work, turning the free spirited original into a heartfelt plea, as only a bluesman can. 4. We Can Work It Out - Heather Nova Lilith Fair vet belies her Bermuda roots with this breathy, personalized take on the classic relationship struggle. 5. Day Tripper – Jimi Hendrix Guitar strings aren’t the only things being bent on this groundbreaking reinvention from the original guitar hero. Hendrix was a huge Beatles fan and actually covered several Beatles songs live, including Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band to open his final UK show for an appreciative audience that included Paul McCartney and George Harrison. Ironically, it was the release of that Beatles classic LP that prevented his debut record, Are You Experienced?, from reaching the top of the charts. 6. You Won't See Me - Dar Williams Pop-folk songstress gives the coffeehouse treatment to the Rubber Soul classic. 7. Let It Be – Nick Cave Nick Cave once kicked his drummer out of the band for suggesting that they cover a Beatles song. Twenty years later, he covers this homage to optimism in typical Nick Cave style, turning it into a beautiful but gloomy funeral dirge. 8. Run For Your Life – Nancy Sinatra Frank’s daughter turns John Lennon’s least favorite Beatles song into a support piece for her hit These Boots Were Made For Walkin’ on her debut LP, Boots. Knowing about her dad’s Vegas connections definitely amplifies the threat in the lyrics, too. Honorable mention here goes to Cowboy Junkies for a rumbling, threatening cover of Sinatra’s cover. 9. What Goes On – Sufjan Stevens Indie darling completely rearranges a lesser known Beatles track (if such a thing exists) and really makes it his own. 10. In My Life - Miriam Makeba South African singer and civil rights activist “Mama Afrika” lost the ability to get gigs in the US when she married confrontational SNCC leader Stokely Carmicheal. When her marriage ended, she returned to the US and won a Grammy, starred in Sarafina, and even performed at the Rumble in the Jungle in 1974. She returned to her native country after 30 years of government enforced exile at the urging of the recently released Nelson Mandela to take part in the healing of the ugly scars of apartheid. 11. I'm Looking Through You - Ted Leo & The Pharmacists The Beatles, coming soon to a rave near you. A clever remixing of a song that seems so familiar yet becomes so different so quickly. Surprising yet sonically pleasing, from a band that has gone on to big things since they formed here in DC. 12. Nowhere Man – Paul Westerberg Ex-Replacements frontman gently strums out a sublime rendition of a classic just dripping with melancholy. For a slightly more upbeat but still beautiful version of this scathing commentary, check out Low’s version of this song. It’s tough to out harmonize The Beatles but Low give the fab four a run for their money.

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literacy + libraries (+ one mouse)

librarymouse It’s National Literacy Day. Right up our alley! Remember the adventure of exploring all the new reads at the school library? And have you discovered the fun of checking out books online? Libraries are amazing, wonderful places.

If you haven’t yet, read Library Mouse with a little one you love. It is captivating. It vividly evokes the joy of reading new books, and it makes writing books seem pretty magical, too.

AND, if you haven’t yet – or even if you already have! - purchase a CD to benefit DC Public Libraries. Our favorite bands generously donated their performances; Proper Topper funded and produced the CD. All proceeds go directly to the DC Public Library Foundation for improvements to neighborhood libraries throughout our nation’s capitol. Now, go read a book! CD-Cover

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behind the curtain

Our fall photo shoot last week was fun and fruitful. Newness will appear online soon for your viewing and shopping pleasure. In the meantime, here's a peek at the project.

 

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photoshoot3 photoshoot2

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what can we bring?

recipesfromthegarden Our haul of tomatoes from the Farmers' Market today was spectacular, so we're thinking a Golden Tomato Tart, from Rosalind Creasy's Recipes from the Garden. (This book is so beautiful, you'll want to weep.) Here's the scoop if you want to try it, too. (For the rest of the wonders, read the book!)

For the marinated tomatoes: 4 to 5 gold tomatoes, thinly sliced 6 to 7 cherry or pear tomatoes, halved 1/2 cup (125 ml) extra-virgin olive oil 1 to 2 garlic cloves, crushed 2 tablespoons chopped parsley 1 tablespoon minced fresh chives Freshly ground black pepper

 

For the filling: 1 cup (225 g) soft goat cheese or natural cream cheese 3 to 4 tablespoons heavy cream 1 tablespoon minced fresh rosemary 1 nine-in (23-cm) prebaked pie shell

Put both kinds of tomatoes into a bowl. In another bowl, combine the ingredients for the marinade. Set aside 1/4 cup (65 ml) of the marinade and pour the rest over the sliced tomatoes. Marinate them for at least 1 hour.

In a mixing bowl, combine the cheese with the cream and work them into a smooth, creamy consistency that will spread easily. Mix in the rosemary and spread the cheese mixture over the cooled pie crust.

Arrange the drained tomato slices in a single-layered circular pattern over cheese mixture, using the large slices for the outside and one slice for the middle. Fill in between the rows of large tomatoes with halved cherry tomatoes. Refrigerate until ready to serve. Just before serving, glaze the tomatoes with the remaining 1/4 cup (65 ml) of the marinating mixture. Serves 6 as an appetizer.

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smidge of a snuggle

express1 Right on cue, nature brought us new weather with the new month. We (and The Washington Post) suggest a subtle shift of mood that’s easy as tying one on. A scarf, that is. (We’ll neither endorse nor condemn the other activity.)

The Post observes that the "near-fallish days (or nights, at least) call for a smidge of snuggle. Chan Luu's lush scarves ($220 at Proper Topper) weave silk and cashmere in raj-gone-ladylike prints. Loop one over a shift dress now or on top of a leather jacket later." (See also our 8.31 post.)

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a little culture, please.

PH2009090103414 Mozart via Hollywood, anyone? Proper Topper’s own Tara McCredie will be performing in “Cosi Fan Tutte Goes Hollywood,” an In Series production of an English-language adaptation of Mozart’s work. Jane Horwitz wrote in The Washington Post, 9/2/09: “Nick Olcott thinks Mozart’s ‘Cosi Fan Tutte’ is the perfect opera. ‘It’s perfectly constructed, perfectly balanced,’ says the director-writer. ‘Just clear and clean and very funny.’ Even so, Olcott dared to tinker with perfection in his 2003 English-language adaptation of the comic opera, ‘Cosi Fan Tutte Goes Hollywood.’ La-La Land in 1929 is the setting for his re-imagining of librettist Lorenzo Da Ponte’s tale of women tricked into betraying their fiances. The In Series production will run at Source Sept. 12-26, in partial rep with the company’s Jazz Age piece ‘From U Street to the Cotton Club.’" “Olcott had no misgivings about translating and adapting “Cosi” to his Hollywood vision. ‘I’m a great believer in trying to demystify opera . . . to understand it’s just another form of musical comedy.’” (Details at the In Series.)

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wonders never cease